MENUMENU

Kellyanne Conway dragged for saying ‘unfunny people on TV’ deserve blame for Pittsburgh shooting

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC-BY-SA)

BTW

Kellyanne Conway, a senior member of President Donald Trump‘s administration, suggested to the hosts of Fox & Friends on Monday that “anti-religiosity” and “the unfunny people on TV shows” were partly to blame for the shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue over the weekend.

The attack at Tree of Life Congregation Synagogue on Saturday left 11 people dead. The suspected shooter, Robert Bowers, shouted anti-Semitic epithets as he shot into the crowd, USA Today reports.

Bowers told a SWAT officer after his arrest that he wanted all Jews to die because they “were committing genocide to his people,” according to CNN.

Conway discussed the attack with Fox & Friends and seemed to imply that “anti-religiosity” was to blame for it occurring.

“The anti-religiosity in this country that is somehow in vogue and funny–to make fun of anybody of faith to be constantly making fun of people who express religion–the late night comedians, the unfunny people on TV shows; it’s always anti-religious,” she said. “And remember, these people were gunned down in their place of worship, as were the people in South Carolina several years ago. They were there because they were people of faith, and it’s that faith that needs to bring us together. This is no time to be driving God out of the public square–no time to be making fun of people.”

Conway’s remarks did not sit well with people online.

https://twitter.com/bensaufley/status/1056901699770687488

Bowers was charged on 29 different counts, including “obstruction of exercise of religious beliefs resulting in death.”

READ MORE: 

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).