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Everyone’s dunking on James Comey’s get-out-the-vote tweet

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)/Flickr (Public Domain)

Our memory isn’t that short.

Former FBI Director James Comey urged people to vote on Tuesday during the midterm elections—and it didn’t go over well.

“Voted. Now going out to knock on doors to urge everyone to vote. Should be fun,” the former FBI director wrote on Twitter.

Since being fired by President Donald Trump and subsequently being at the center of much controversy, Comey has become more vocal about his desire for people to vote.

In an op-ed published in the New York Times on Tuesday, the former FBI director asked people to vote today to “uphold our nation’s values,” and he criticized the political climate in the country.

“I feel the giant stirring. The awakening is slow, but it is underway. Torches and death in Charlottesville. Children in cages at the border. The lying, misogyny, racism and attacks on the rule of law from our president,” he wrote. “These things poke the giant. It takes time, but the American people are stirring. They always do. And when they awaken, these fevers break very quickly.”

In July, the former FBI director urged people to vote for Democrats during today’s midterm election, arguing that Republicans in Congress had “proven incapable of fulfilling the Founders’ design that ‘Ambition must … counteract ambition.”

However, for all of his urging, Comey did not find much love online.

Some people made jokes about his infamous letter regarding Hillary Clinton just ahead of the 2016 election.

Others said they would be sad to see Comey instead of other high-profile people who have decided to try and get out the vote like Oprah Winfrey and Will Ferrell.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).