Revenge porn king Hunter Moore sentence to 2.5 years in prison

Hunter Moore, described by others as the king of revenge porn and by himself as a “professional life ruiner,” is going to prison.

A federal district judge in California sentenced Moore on Wednesday to two and a half years in prison, plus three years supervised release and a $2,000 fine.

Moore owned IsAnyoneUp.com, a notorious website where nude pictures were posted of women without permission. Moore endured numerous legal threats under the protection of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which prevents website owners from being held legally liable for content that users post.

The website, which at its height received over 30 million views per month, received some pictures through submissions, but many others came from hacked email accounts. Moore pled guilty to computer hacking and aggravated identity theft.

Charles Evens, the hacker Moore hired, was sentenced to two years and one months in prison for his role.

The federal investigation into Moore likely began in February 2012, but may have begun sooner. In 2013, when California criminalized revenge porn, Moore took to YouTube to disparage the state.

Nonconsensual pornography, or revenge porn, is currently illegal to greater and lesser degrees in 27 states. Another 11 states are considering legislation against sharing these types of images online. Federal legislation criminalizing revenge porn has been in the works for more than a year, but it has yet to be introduced.

H/T Motherboard | Photo via Hunter Moore/Twitter | Remix by Jason Reed

 

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill is a notable cybersecurity reporter whose work has focused on the dark net, national security, and law enforcement. A former senior writer at the Daily Dot, O'Neill joined CyberScoop in October 2016. I am a cybersecurity journalist at CyberScoop. I cover the security industry, national security and law enforcement.