Grinding out the vote: gay dating app Grindr launches 2012 election plan

Grindr

Grindr will send out geo-targeted voting reminders this election season in an attempt to “mobilize gay men as a political bloc.”

Grindr, the location-based dating and networking app for gay men, has announced its U.S. 2012 Election Plan, the latest initiative in its Grind for Equality program, which began in February.

“As a company,” Grinder told the Daily Dot, “we have a responsibility to our community, which is why we recently announced our U.S. 2012 Election Plan which will mobilize our community through our network of more than 1.5 million users in America to enhance GLBT rights this election season.”

The U.S. Election Plan seeks to encourage the community to register and vote in the upcoming elections, local and well as presidential, by providing them with registration and voting locations and reminders. They hope “ to mobilize gay men as a political bloc in the 2012 elections by delivering geo-targeted messages about equality issues.”

For the presidential election, gay voters in swing states will be targeted. For state issues, such as the proposed constitutional ban on same-sex marriage on the ballot in Minnesota, voters there will be targeted to vote the measure down.

The Grindr blog quotes founder and CEO Joel Simkhai as saying, “We must elect not only a president but representatives and senators who are supportive of our community and our equality. Local elections have national impact, so we want to use Grindr as a tool for mobilizing and connecting gay men around the country to help make a combined national impact.”

In fact, Grindr hopes to build a coalition of gay voters focused on equality that will endure past the next round of elections.

“Once the election is over,” a company spokesperson said, “Grindr for Equality will continue to work for equal rights for our community both locally and internationally.”

Photo via Grindr

Curt Hopkins

Curt Hopkins

Curt Hopkins has over two decades of experience as a journalist, editorial strategist, and social media manager. His work has been published by Ars Technica, Reuters, Los Angeles Times, and San Francisco Chronicle. He is the also founding director of the Committee to Protect Bloggers, the first organization devoted to global free speech rights for bloggers