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Far-right Twitter keeps getting angry over a video of a reporter doing Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s workout

European University Institute/Flickr (CC-BY-SA)

There is a lot involved in the workout routine.

Last year, a Politico reporter tried to do Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg‘s workout routine and determined it to be pretty intense.

But after the news outlet reposted the story on Twitter—just hours before President Donald Trump is expected to announce his choice to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy—right-wing Twitter exploded, and was convinced the workout was easy.

Because—conservatives and Trump supporters,who love old gender stereotypes and pride themselves on being “alphas”—couldn’t stop laughing at a man supposedly struggling with a workout designed for a woman.

The workout includes a number of different exercises, like:

  • Elliptical
  • Pushups and uneven pushups
  • Side planks
  • Stretching
  • Chest press
  • Leg extension
  • Leg curls
  • Wide grip lat pull down
  • Seated rowing
  • Butterfly press
  • Standing rowing
  • One-legged squats
  • Abduction and adduction
  • Free weight workout
  • Calisthenics and plyometrics

In the video, the Politico reporter says “this is murder” in the middle of the workout, which is probably understandable considering the scope of the routine.

To a lot of men on the right, he needed to be called out on his supposed failings.

@TCC_Grouchy/Twitter

@natejundt/Twitter

@RealJamesWoods/Twitter

@smallgovlizard/Twitter

@Grantavius/Twitter

@valrich79/Twitter

@loribrannon/Twitter

But… fun fact: They did this whole song and dance when it first came out in 2017.

And what about in March when Stephen Colbert tried it and the video went viral?

Basically, any time it is in the news, conservatives on Twitter seem to lose it.

If they think it is a breeze, they should try it themselves, instead of just calling a media members cucks.

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).