RIP John Delaney’s campaign, which died tonight at the hands of Elizabeth Warren

At the second Democratic presidential debate tonight, former Maryland congressman John Delaney learned that debating good is real hard.

As the official wife guy tried to set himself apart from the bottom of the pack, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) saw an opportunity to turn his weakness to her advantage. Twitter was here for it.

Warren was already getting online accolades for a fiery performance full of instant sound bites, like telling Delaney to stop using Republican talking points, when Delaney said that Democrats shouldn’t pursue progressive policies that are popular with the left-wing of the party.

Warren was ready.

“I can’t understand why anyone goes through the trouble of running for president just to talk about what we can’t do,” she said.

And the crowd went wild.

One extremely clever person even edited Delaney’s Wiki during the debate to add a date of death.

While some were content to tap-dance on the grave of Delaney’s campaign, others wondered why he was getting so much air time in the first place.

Who decided John Delaney is the guy at zero percent who should get more time from the moderators than the people who have cracked one percent?” Brian Beutler tweeted. MSNBC correspondent Sam Seder was similarly confused. “Why is John Delaney getting any questions? This is absurd,” he wondered.

The Delaney campaign might take some solace in the fact that he was leading the race for the biggest improvement in how many people were Googling him, according to NBC.

Unfortunately for him, odds are, they were just trying to find out who was getting slaughtered on national television.

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Claire Goforth

Claire Goforth

Claire Goforth is a Jacksonville, Florida-based journalist covering politics, culture, justice, and unicorns. Her work has appeared in publications ranging from regional alt-weeklies to Al Jazeera.