Charleston shooter endorses segregation and white supremacy in manifesto

Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white man accused of murdering nine black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina, wrote a manifesto.

A website with photos of Roof and a 2,500-word essay on “racial awareness” confirms in the most certain sense the white supremacist motives behind the Charleston killings.

“I have no choice,’’ the essay reads. “I am not in the position to, alone, go into the ghetto and fight. I chose Charleston because it is most historic city in my state, and at one time had the highest ratio of blacks to Whites in the country. We have no skinheads, no real KKK, no one doing anything but talking on the internet. Well someone has to have the bravery to take it to the real world, and I guess that has to be me.”

The website is called the Last Rhodesian. One of the first photos circulated of Roof showed him wearing a flag of Rhodesia, a powerful racist symbol for online white supremacists. The domain was registered using Dylann Roof’s name.

The photos include Roof burning the American flag, waving a Confederate battle flag and holding a pistol, and drawing racist iconography into the sand of a beach.

Last Rhodesian

“Say you were to witness a dog being beat by a man,” the essay reads. “You are almost surely going to feel very sorry for that dog. But then say you were to witness a dog biting a man. You will most likely not feel the same pity you felt for the dog for the man. Why? Because dogs are lower than men. This same analogy applies to black and White relations.”

Roof also endorses segregation and dives into the rationale behind his racism: “Negroes have lower Iqs, lower impulse control, and higher testosterone levels in generals.”

Photo by eyeliam/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) 

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill

Patrick Howell O'Neill is a notable cybersecurity reporter whose work has focused on the dark net, national security, and law enforcement. A former senior writer at the Daily Dot, O'Neill joined CyberScoop in October 2016. I am a cybersecurity journalist at CyberScoop. I cover the security industry, national security and law enforcement.