White House asks public to comment on voter-fraud commission, immediately gets goatse’d

The White House is inviting members of the public to comment on the Trump administration’s controversial voter-fraud commission—and the early responses are brutal.

In early May, President Donald Trump signed an executive order establishing the commission (or “voter fraud panel,” as he called it on Twitter). It has since faced extreme push back from states after it requested voters’ first and last names, birthdays, last four digits of their Social Security numbers, and voting histories going back to 2006.

On Thursday, the Trump administration announced that it would accept written comments from the public for the commission to consider—with the caveat that any post could be viewed publicly on the White House website.

The White House also released a number of emails it received regarding the commission from June 29 to July 11. Many people mocked the commission’s desire to collect that much information on Americana voters. One person expressed their views by sharing a link to the infamously grotesque goatse photo, which most people would likely avoid at all cost.

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Here are a few of the other highlights. (The Daily Dot has redacted the names of people sending the emails.)

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Not everyone was against the idea.

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You can read all of the comments released by the White House here. To send comments to the White House about the commission, email [email protected].

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).