Trump can’t stop tweeting about the border wall as shutdown looms

President Donald Trump has been tweeting about the proposed border wall for the past 24 hours, punctuated with stray thoughts about ISIS and Syria in the wake of his decision to withdraw troops from that country, and the retirement of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.

Today, the Senate will vote on an omnibus bill to keep the government funded; if the bill doesn’t include the proposed $5 billion for Trump’s border wall project, the president has vowed to veto the bill and shut the government down “for a very long time.”

While Trump said in a meeting with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) that he would be proud to shut down the government if the bill didn’t include the proposed funding, he’s now reversed course and is preemptively blaming Democrats for the shutdown.

The tirade truly began in earnest yesterday.

“The Democrats, who know Steel Slats (Wall) are necessary for Border Security, are putting politics over Country. What they are just beginning to realize is that I will not sign any of their legislation, including infrastructure, unless it has perfect Border Security. U.S.A. WINS!” he began on Thursday.

Trump continued threatening the shut down in a series of tweets, calling on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to bring out the “Nuclear Option”—removing the option to filibuster and requiring only a simple majority, not a 60-vote majority, to pass the bill.

Trump praised the House for passing legislation late last night that included wall funding, the went on and on and on.

And on.

Senators are now headed to Washington for a vote on the funding package.  Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) tweeted Friday that he would “vote no on this stupid wall.”

Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) called the president’s attempts to blame the shutdown on Democrats “bullshit” while talking with Chris Hayes Thursday night.

According to the Washington Post, many government agencies are in the final stages of preparing for a shutdown. The Post estimates that some 480,000 workers would be affected by the shutdown, including Customs and Border Patrol and Transportation Security Agency workers.

A Senate vote is expected to occur around noon.

Ellen Ioanes

Ellen Ioanes

Ellen Ioanes is the FOIA reporter at the Daily Dot, where she covers U.S. politics. She is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School, and her work has appeared in the Guardian, the Center for Public Integrity, HuffPost India, and more.