Trump tweets he’s sending in federal help for Chicago’s gun ‘epidemic’

Photo via Gage Skidmore (CC-BY-SA)

BTW

During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump occasionally made mention of the gun violence Chicago continuously endures, and he said he would be the one to help reduce the city’s murder rate by “send(ing) in the feds” in order “to fix the horrible carnage.” On Friday, Trump said via Twitter that he was sending federal help.

According to the Chicago Sun-Times, it was confirmed on Thursday that about 20 agents with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) have traveled to Chicago on a permanent basis to help stop the violence. Those ATF agents have joined a team with officers from the Chicago Police Department and the Illinois State Police that will use ballistics technology to solve crimes and get gun traffickers off the streets.

U.S. attorney’s office prosecutors will also focus on whether suspects in gun crimes should be charged with state or federal crimes.

“The goal is the prosecute as many of these guys as possible federally where they will serve longer prison terms,” Anthony Riccio, who leads the Chicago Police Department’s organized crime unit, said via the Sun-Times.

The idea of a new strike force was reportedly born last November, and in March, a police official met with Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C. to discuss how to proceed.

According to the Sun-Times, there were about 760 killings in 2016, the deadliest year in Chicago in the past two decades. As of Thursday, 320 murders had been committed in Chicago this year, two less than at this same point in 2016.

Aside from the strike force and prosecution discussions, it’s unclear if Trump has other plans to intervene in Chicago’s gun problem.

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz

Josh Katzowitz is a staff writer at the Daily Dot specializing in YouTube and boxing. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times. A longtime sports writer, he's covered the NFL for CBSSports.com and boxing for Forbes. His work has been noted twice in the Best American Sports Writing book series.