Sen. Chuck Schumer

Photo via Senate Democrats/Flickr (CC-BY)

They’re vowing to fight, but will they?

Almost minutes after President Donald Trump announced he would pick Judge Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) pledged to fight the nomination.

Schumer has been under fire from his base who want Democrats—who infamously caved on DACA and the government shutdown fight—to stand strong against the president’s nominee.

In his statement, Schumer said that blocking the nominee could lead the president to pick a more moderate choice (like former nominee Merrick Garland, whom Schumer asked Trump to pick).

Schumer also addressed the issue of reproductive rights in his statement, saying Trump, in nominating Kavanaugh, picked someone who would willingly put Roe v. Wade on “the chopping block.”

Other Democratic senators issued fiery press releases. Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) called Kavanaugh’s record on reproductive rights “troubling” and said he had “grave concerns” about the choice.

Schatz in his statement also took issue with another part of the president’s decision making process: that he was using a list pre-approved by the Federalist Society, a staunchly conservative think tank.

Still other Democratic senators issued strong statements against Kavanaugh—as well as the Senate moving on the matter—on Twitter.

Schumer, Schatz, Harris, Gillibrand, and others have the difficult task of keeping all 49 Democratic senators in lockstep, which maybe not be as strong a bloc as they hope. Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) said he could see himself voting for Trump’s pick.

In addition to keeping his members in line, Schumer needs to finagle two “no” votes out of Republicans to sink Kavanaugh.

When Kavanaugh was approved in 2006 to the U.S. appeals court, four Democratic senators voted in favor of him. One, Tom Carper (D-Del.), remains.

Carper had not released a statement about Kavanaugh as of press time.

David Covucci

David Covucci

David Covucci is the Layer 8 editor at the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the web. His work has appeared in Vice, the Huffington Post, Jezebel, Gothamist, and other publications. He is particularly interested in hearing any tips you have. Reach out at [email protected]

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Trump nominates Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court
If he's confirmed, the court will lean conservative in the decades to come.
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