The 7 best moments from Saturday’s Democratic debate

The three remaining Democratic presidential candidates took the stage in Iowa for the second debate of the 2016 election cycle on Saturday night, weighing in on everything from terrorism to college tuition. 

The evening began on a somber note, with the candidates directly addressing how they would deal with the threat of terrorism—a hot topic freshly renewed by the deadly attacks on Paris Friday night that killed more than 120 people Over the following two hours, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Sen. Bernie Sanders, and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley tried to sell themselves to the American people as the next commander-in-chief. 

But why sit through hours of political jargon when you can get the best of the best in six-second clips? Here are the key moments of the debate.

1. Sanders says climate change is “directly related” to a rise in terrorism, a claim he’s made in the past

2. Sanders says he wouldn’t raise taxes as high as they were under President Dwight D. Eisenhower, which peaked at 94 percent. Sanders refused to give an exact number for his proposed tax increase.

3. O’Malley calls Donald Trump, a leading Republican presidential candidate who has made the deportation of millions of undocumented immigrants the centerpiece of his campaign, an “immigrant-bashing carnival barker.”

4. Clinton defends President Barack Obama‘s record as president.

5. O’Malley says that “indeed, black lives matter,” a rebuttal to those who believe that singling out African-Americans over Americans of other races is discriminatory and devaluing. 

6. Just as Sanders was about to discuss corruption on Wall Street, CBS News debate moderator John Dickerson interrupts him to cut to a commercial break—an irony that cracks up Clinton.

7. O’Malley pushes back against Clinton’s proposal to regulate Wall Street banks, which some have called “weak.”

Screengrab via CBS News

Andrew Couts

Andrew Couts

Andrew Couts is the former editor of Layer 8, a section dedicated to the intersection of the Internet and the state—and the gaps in between. Prior to the Daily Dot, Couts served as features editor and features writer for Digital Trends, associate editor of TheWeek.com, and associate editor at Maxim magazine. When he’s not working, Couts can be found hiking with his German shepherds or blasting around on motorcycles.