Cohen’s ‘never been to Prague’ tweet comes back to haunt him (updated)

CNN/YouTube

Trump’s former lawyer reportedly had a cell phone ping in Prague in 2016.

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump‘s former lawyer, had a cell phone ping off over cell towers around Prague in 2016, according to a new report, which several people online quickly pointed out contradicts the idea that he had “never” been to the city, as he said in the past.

McClatchy reports that a mobile phone traced to Cohen pinged cell towers around Prague in the summer of 2016, around the same time that the so-called Steele dossier said he met with Russian officials about the 2016 election. The news outlet says four people spoke with them about the latest information.

After the dossier was published, Cohen posted a photo of his passport on Twitter, claiming “I have never been to Prague in my life. #fakenews.”

Cohen also reiterated the claim on Sean Hannity‘s Fox News show and questioned the accuracy of McClatchy’s reporting in April.

His lawyer, Lanny Davis, also denied that Cohen had been in Prague when questioned by the news outlet.

More recently, Cohen—who is reportedly working with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation—was sentenced to three years in prison by a federal judge for charges including bank fraud and tax evasion.

The “never been to Prague” line of Cohen’s quickly was rediscovered, and mocked on Twitter, in light of McClatchy’s report.

Others thought perhaps other—more salacious—parts of the Steele dossier may also be true. “Next stop, pee pee tape,” someone riffed on Twitter.

You can read all of McClatchy’s report here.

Update 5:02pm CT, Dec. 27Pressed on whether he would admit to having been in the Czech Republic “ever? For any reason? At any time?” Cohen responded with a one-syllable tweet: “NO.”

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Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich

Andrew Wyrich is a politics staff writer for the Daily Dot, covering the intersection of politics and the internet. Andrew has written for USA Today, NorthJersey.com, and other newspapers and websites. His work has been recognized by the Society of the Silurians, Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).