#ByeByeBoris trends after U.K. Supreme Court rules Johnson unlawfully suspended Parliament

After British Prime Minister Boris Johnson had Queen Elizabeth prorogue (suspend) Parliament in order to push through his no-deal Brexit, the decision was challenged in both English and Scottish courts.

With the English court finding for Boris and the Scottish court declaring his actions illegal (and that he had misrepresented the situation to the queen in order to acquire her agreement), the case was passed on the U.K. Supreme Court, for its first major decision.

Today, in a surprisingly unanimous decision, the court found against Johnson, declaring that he gave the queen “advice that was unlawful,” and that his suspension of Parliament was, as a result, also against the law.

The decision centers on whether Johnson was right to suspend Parliament for a full five weeks as the deadline for Brexit approached, and whether he misled the queen, implying the suspension was simply to end the previous session of Parliament and have her give a speech outlining new policy, or whether it was intended to prevent Parliament from blocking the U.K. from leaving the European Union without a deal.

The Supreme Court President Lady Hale went on to say that as a result of Boris’ actions, “the effect on the fundamentals of democracy was extreme.”

Ministers from all parties are now calling on Boris to resign, as are the Welsh and Scottish First Ministers, Mark Drakeford and Nicola Sturgeon.

On Twitter, the hashtags #byebyeboris, #BorisOut, and #Prorogation are all trending, with even some Brexit supporters coming out against the prime minister and his actions.

Members of the public are also calling for Johnson’s resignation.

There’s even a push for him to face criminal charges.

There’s a lot of disgust over his approach to the law in general, especially in light of Johnson “disagreeing” with the court’s ruling in an interview.

Twitter has also rapidly formed a new fandom around Lady Hale and her spider broach.

And the meme game is strong.

Others are playing what may become Johnson’s new anthem.

READ MORE:

Siobhan Ball

Siobhan Ball

Siobhan Ball is a historian, archivist, and journalist. She also writes for Autostraddle and bi.org