MENUMENU

Bureau of Land Management site now features a giant wall of coal

Coal Seam

Photo via Peabody Energy/Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY)

A picture speaks a thousand words—or, in this case, millions of tons of coal.

Call it a sign of the times.

The lead image on the website of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) once featured an image of two backpackers enjoying the vast wildness America offers. Today, that image has been replaced with a massive mountain of coal.

This was the BLM homepage as of Wednesday, April 5.

Screenshot via blm.gov/Wayback Machine

This is the BLM homepage now:

BLM Hompage Coal Screenshot via blm.gov

BLM, an agency within the Department of the Interior, manages over 245 million acres of land, including over 5,700 miles of trails in conservation and recreational lands and 2,400 miles of land along American rivers.

Of course, swapping out a photo changes nothing about BLM’s agenda—the agency plans to feature many photos—but it does reflect the shift toward a focus on fossil fuels under the Trump administration.

As Mashable reports, the Interior Department halted all new leases for coal mining on public lands under the Obama administration. That has already changed under President Donald Trump. On March 15, for example, U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke approved a $22 million lease to the Canyon Fuel Company, LLC, which plans to extract 56 million tons of coal from public land in Utah.

The coal photo will reportedly not remain for long. A BLM spokeswoman tells the Huffington Post it will be swapped out again on Friday.

H/T Mashable

Andrew Couts

Andrew Couts

Andrew Couts is the former editor of Layer 8, a section dedicated to the intersection of the Internet and the state—and the gaps in between. Prior to the Daily Dot, Couts served as features editor and features writer for Digital Trends, associate editor of TheWeek.com, and associate editor at Maxim magazine. When he’s not working, Couts can be found hiking with his German shepherds or blasting around on motorcycles.