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‘Breakfast Club’ video smear against Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez backfires

Julian Jensen/YouTube

In raising the profile of the video, the trolls have won Ocasio-Cortez more fans.

Right-wing trolls are sharing a college video of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) dancing as part of a cheesy Breakfast Club parody in their latest and weirdest bid to smear the Democratic Socialist congresswoman they love to hate.

The video appeared on Thursday, posted by an apparent QAnon conspiracy theorist and shared by dozens of conservatives accounts.

The original video, posted publicly to YouTube in 2010, features Boston University students recreating the dance scene from iconic 1985 movie The Breakfast Club.

Almost immediately, there was backlash to the tweet for branding the video as proof that Ocasio-Cortez was a “clueless nitwit.” Confused Twitter users were unsure about what exactly the problem was.

Many people loved it.

One user pointed out that the video had, in fact, been edited to swap out the original music, “Lisztomania” by Phoenix, for some “porny drums.”

This latest attack on Ocasio-Cortez builds on the momentum of a long-running narrative, which re-emerged in recent days across fringe far-right media outlets after a Gateway Pundit “exclusive” hit piece.

Reminiscent of its smear job on Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser Christine Blasey Ford in September, the website ran photos from Ocasio-Cortez’s high school yearbook on Wednesday in a bid to paint her as a member of the wealthy “elite.”

Conservatives have become obsessed with Ocasio-Cortez’s outspoken Democratic Socialism, stories of her working class origins in the Bronx, and her having moved to wealthy New York suburb Yorktown Heights in her teens.

If it all seems a little desperate, that’s because it is. In fact, it looks like in raising the profile of the video, the trolls have won the New York congresswoman more fans.

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David Gilmour

David Gilmour

David Gilmour is a reporter who specializes in national politics, internet culture, and technology. He previously covered civil liberties, crime, and politics for Vice.