Obama’s approval rating is the highest it’s been in 7 years

When his critics go low, President Barack Obama‘s approval rating goes high.

At least, that’s how it seems according to the latest polling results.

Obama’s post-election approval rating clocks in at 57 percent, his highest since a rating of 58 percent in September 2009, according to a CNN/ORC national poll published Wednesday. 

The poll collected data from interviews with 1,003 adults nationwide, with the margin of error being 3 percent. Thirty percent said they were Democrats, 27 percent Republicans, and 43 percent independents or members of other parties.

Obama’s favorability rating also jumped to 59 percent, his highest since his October 2009 rating of 60 percent.

America’s two most prominent political parties didn’t fare too well, however. The Democratic Party holds a favorability rating of just 39 percent, a decrease of 6 percent from the last poll, whereas the Republican Party holds a rating of 41 percent, an increase of 5 percent.

The numbers on President-elect Donald Trump are down, too. Fifty-four percent of folks polled don’t think Trump cares about people like them, and 57 percent do not believe he is honest and trustworthy. 

Of those polled, however, 49 percent feel Trump can bring the kind of change America needs, and 50 percent feel he can manage the government effectively. Only 43 percent think he can unite the country instead of divide it.

Meanwhile, around the same time period after Obama won his first election, 73 percent of those polled believe he cared about people like them, and 72 percent thought he was honest and trustworthy. 

Though if there’s anything we’ve learned about polling results from this election it’s that they aren’t always right

H/T the Week

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.