Serena Williams’ pregnant ‘Vanity Fair’ cover could not be more iconic

Photo via VanityFair/Twitter JustinCentric/Twitter (Fair Use) Remix by Samantha Grasso

Let us all bask in her pregnant glory.

On Tuesday, world’s greatest tennis star and unparalleled goddess Serena Williams unleashed upon the world her Vanity Fair cover, in which she bared a pregnant side-profile for iconic photographer Annie Leibovitz. And, my god, the internet WAS NOT READY.

With her hair billowing behind her, shoulders dropped, head high, and protruding belly accented with a jeweled body chain, Williams is untouchable, exuding strength and pride. And yet her portrait cannot be done justice with a reaction of adjectives alone.

Here are 15 ways Twitter is reacting to Williams’ pregnant Vanity Fair cover, emoji and gifs running rampant with adoration and excitement.

Of course, Williams is an absolute queen.

https://twitter.com/JustinCentric/status/879678370790944768

Mother Earth, even.

Or perhaps, the greatest otherworldly person of all time.

C’mon, her baby is definitely a demigod.

At least a princess, for sure.

Or, perhaps, Williams’ babe is a savior all their own?

And then there are the gifs. Loads and loads of gifs.

Really, Williams must have known she was throwing a wrench into this entire work week with that photo.

I mean, anything to be like the reigning tennis champion, amirite?

However, despite Twitter running aflame with the announcement of Williams’ pregnancy photo shoot, the athlete’s news was minimally, if not barely, rained upon by retired tennis player John McEnroe, who said two days prior that if Williams “played the men’s circuit, she’d be like 700 in the world.” While Williams clapped back in the most classy way possible, her later-unveiled magazine cover had several people defending her while insulting McEnroe.

Williams is a reckoning force, and her baby? Well, that child will more than likely be a prodigy of its own, too.

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.