Scary apocalypse message interrupts TV programming in California

BTW

Another day, another sign of the apocalypse.

A weird emergency message interrupted the regular scheduled TV broadcasts of some Californians Friday to warn that end times are nigh.

The terrifying warnings aired for Cox and Spectrum users in the Orange County area, the Orange County Register reported.

In one video of the broadcast, a panicked, breathless voice warns about “disasters that are coming.”

“The space program made contact with… They are not what they claim to be,” the voice says. “They have infiltrated a lot of, uh, a lot of aspects of military establishment, particularly Area 51. The disasters that are coming—the military—I’m sorry the government knows about them…”

Gizmodo reported that the audio actually came from the conspiracy theory-themed radio show called Coast to Coast AM. In 1997, host Art Bell received a call from a dude claiming to be a former Area 51 employee (listen to the full creepy audio here).

Another video of the emergency message has a different, more dictator-sounding voice.

“Extremely violent times will come,” the voice says.

Redditor smittenkitten77 discovered the audio is a clip of a sermon from Christian radio show Insight for Living with Chuck Swindoll.

One Cox customer told the Register she thought she was hearing Hitler.

“It sounded like a radio broadcast coming through the television,” she said.

It’s uncertain who’s behind the messages and whether they were intentional, but a Cox spokesperson told Gizmodo that the message came in after radio stations were conducting their monthly emergency test, which the cable networks typically air.

A Spectrum spokesperson confirmed to the Register that they were “fed an incorrect audio file.”

Meanwhile, it looks like the world may live to see yet another day.

H/T Gizmodo

Kris Seavers

Kris Seavers

Kris Seavers is the IRL editor for the Daily Dot. Her work has appeared in Central Texas publications, including Austin Monthly and San Antonio Magazine, and on NPR.