A US Marines platoon waits to hear the results of the Third Annual Joint Service Drill Exhibition in Washington April 10, 2010.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

Marines react to revenge porn investigation by distributing more revenge porn

Contrary to military reports, Marines are still uploading nudes and videos to Facebook, Google Drives, and porn sites.

 

Samantha Grasso

IRL

Published Mar 10, 2017   Updated May 24, 2021, 9:10 pm CDT

The men behind the Marines revenge porn scandal aren’t done sharing pictures of female military members and have even begun spreading the photos to at least one porn website.

On Monday, news broke that the Department of Defense is investigating hundreds of Marines for their possible involvement in a Facebook group called “Marines United,” a secret page where male marines shared thousands of nude photos of female military members.

More than 30,000 Facebook users were members of the group, and 2,500 Facebook comments related to the photos had been shared. Photos of the women were both uploaded to Facebook and shared through a Google Drive folder. More than two dozen women have been identified by their name, rank, and station.

According to CNN, military officials said the Google Drive folder had been removed at the military’s request, and Facebook said they would remove the content. As of Wednesday, CNN was still able to access the Google Drive.

A new CNN report, however, reveals that the scandal has only grown in the days since. Members of the Marines United page have been redirected to new pages, one of them called Marines United 2.0. The new page allegedly includes settings to stop “blue falcons”—a term for a betrayer—from accessing the group.

The pages started out as a place for Marines to reconnect and chat, an unidentified Marine veteran told CNN. But then people began posting pictures of naked women, and said some women even submitted their own. The veteran said there are multiple sites being run by 20 to 30 people—one group admin even deactivates his group every few days and starts a new one.

There’s also a new DropBox account for photos, and some members are posting videos to porn sites such as PornHub, according to Task and Purpose.

The new groups and outlets for disseminating the photos appear to be an act of retaliation, with a few members mocking or egging on the investigators.

“It would be hilarious if one of these FBI or (Naval Criminal Investigative Service) fucks found their wife on here,” one member wrote in the original Facebook group.

“My dad just asked if I was a part of the group Marines United. He just saw all the hubbub on the interwebs about the ‘scandal’ going on. Statements made by the media, ‘The group was shut down with hours,’ and ‘The pictures have been removed’…bwahahahahahaha. Not nearly boys!” another member posted in the group.

According to CNN, members of the group responded excitedly to being outed, some posting more nude images mocking the investigation, and others advised to not admit to anything.

The unidentified Marine veteran who spoke with CNN said these images aren’t revenge porn, but by definition they are. Laws against posting explicit photos or videos without a person’s consent, aka revenge porn, are gaining ground across the United States. It’s currently illegal to share revenge porn in 34 states, and under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which governs the Marines.

H/T Death and Taxes

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*First Published: Mar 10, 2017, 12:30 pm CST