person with caption 'Nah boss I still love my job but it's the way you told me I would become a shift lead because I work so hard, but then not acknowledge it again and give it to someone else kinda threw me for a loop' (l) wood figure leadership concept with blue figure in foreground with other wooden figures in background with a red one in front of grey background (c) person with caption 'Nah boss I still love my job but it's the way you told me I would become a shift lead because I work so hard, but then not acknowledge it again and give it to someone else kinda threw me for a loop' (r)

PattyPhoto/Shutterstock @jordynnnnm05/TikTok (Licensed)

‘Kinda threw me for a loop’: Worker says manager promised her a promotion—then gave the position to someone else

‘They did this to me so I just got another job.’

 

Jack Alban

IRL

A large number of employees leave their jobs not because they hate their work, but because they can’t stand their managers. In one 2015 Gallup poll conducted with 7,000+ employees, around 50% of them said they’ve quit positions just to “get away” from a boss.

Seven years later at the height of the “Great Resignation,” Better Works corroborated that this sentiment among the workforce may still very be the same, claiming that “employees don’t quit their jobs, they quit their bosses.”

And judging by a recently viral TikTok posted by @jordynnnnm05, it appears that there are a number of workers who are just as irked by the behavior of their workplace managers.

In the clip, the TikToker calls out her boss for promising a promotion but then never delivering on it, instead handing it over to someone else in the company. She states that the behavior “threw [her] for a loop” and users on the platform seem to have had similar experiences at their own workplaces.

@jordynnnnm05 Yuhhhh #work #pleaseboss ♬ I been drinking – Rea

She writes in a text overlay of the video snippet, “Nah boss I still love my job but it’s the way you told me I would become a shift lead because I work so hard, but then not acknowledge it again and give it to someone else kinda threw me for a loop.”

There are tons of forum posts online where employees have complained about this very same phenomenon, like one Quora user who posed the question, “Have you ever been led on at work, promised a raise or promotion that never came?”

Throngs of people responded that this has happened to them at one point or another, with one user writing, “It was only a lie, to keep you around working at your established pay, without complaining. For a while. They fully expect that you will at some point come back with a request for the raise, and they will give you some other excuse and another wave-off.”

TikTokers who replied to @jordynnnnm05’s clip also vented about their own workplace woes, like one user who wrote that their boss had requested she apply for the lead position, but then ultimately gave it to someone else who wasn’t even initially interested in it.

“When he ASKED me to put my name in for the Lead position, then gave it to someone who wasn’t even in the running,” they wrote.

“I just left my comfort job bc they did the same thing to me gave the promotion to someone with no experience and only worked for the company 90 days,” another shared.

It could be that because of treatment from managers like this, so many employees are actively “job-hopping” while they are currently employed in search of higher salaries and better benefits/payouts. Several social media users and career counselors recommend job hopping once it becomes apparent that there is a lack of upward career mobility in one’s current role. It’s also easier to possibly nab higher paying positions when one is already employed, as workers are viewed as a more valuable asset.

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