Christian Life Church slgckgc/Flickr U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement/Flickr Kris Seavers Kris Seavers

Newsletter: A pastor’s racist email, ICE-forced hysterectomies, and more

Plus: Rosh Hashanah in the time of COVID-19 and more.

 

Kris Seavers

IRL

Published Sep 17, 2020   Updated Jan 27, 2021, 6:42 pm CST

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I had forgotten that Halloween is around the corner, but if Karen masks are the “it” item this year, I’ll happily skip spooky season. In other news, this week:

  • Pastor’s misogynistic, racist email leaked on Twitter
  • What was missed in the viral rush of the ICE-forced hysterectomies story
  • Could blowing the shofar during Rosh Hashanah spread the coronavirus?
David Muns - Blur
Christian Life Church

BREAK THE INTERNET

Pastor’s misogynistic, racist email leaked on Twitter

A racist email from Michigan pastor David Muns was exposed online by Korean-American journalist Sarah Jeong on Tuesday. On Wednesday, Muns told the Daily Dot that he has apologized to her.

The racist email appears to be in response to a meme with a quote incorrectly attributed to Jeong that was debunked by Snopes in 2018. The fake quote attributed to Jeong says that there should be a “castration lottery” for white men.

Read the full story here.

—Nahila Bonfiglio, contributing writer


U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Officer
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement/Flickr (Public Domain)

FACT-CHECK

What was missed in the viral rush of the ICE-forced hysterectomies story

A whistleblower complaint alleging “forced hysterectomies” Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in Georgia created a firestorm in headlines, but a closer inspection of the complaint reveals deficiencies in the reporting now circulating. A few believe the allegation itself—whether true or not, which is far from clear—is being amplified by nefarious actors, potentially foreign.

Read the full story here.

—Nahila Bonfiglio, contributing writer


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Recommended

  • If you like true crime podcasts, you’re probably already familiar with Michelle McNamara and her quest to find the Golden State Killer. But just as much as it’s about the crime, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, an HBO series based on McNamara’s book of the same name, is about the journalist sleuth. Three episodes in, I’m in it more for the precious personal anecdotes from people like McNamara’s husband comedian Patton Oswalt, who helped finished the book after her untimely death, than the mystery shrouding the killer himself.
  • The Daily Dot’s Gavia Baker-Whitelaw calls The Third Day a “fully fledged folk horror story,” and with a four-star review, it’s an excellent one, to boot.
  • The best option to protect yourself and your family are FDA-registered surgical masks—but buying them on Amazon is a bad idea. We’ll explain why, as well as where should you buy them, to ensure you’re getting the real thing.*

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shofar
slgckgc/Flickr (CC-BY)

FROM OUR FRIENDS AT NAUTILUS

Could blowing the shofar during Rosh Hashanah spread the coronavirus?

As the Jewish High Holy Days—Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur—approach this September, health experts and rabbis have begun issuing guidance on how to observe the holidays without spreading COVID-19. In particular, blowing the shofar could become problematic.

Read the full story here.

—Tess Cagle, contributing writer

SELF-CARE: THE WINDOW SEAT

emma window seat

This week, my cat got the window seat. That is, she got a semi-permament, suction-cupped to the glass, just strong enough to hold her little body seat propped awkwardly in the living room (see above). And she’s thrilled about the new vantage point! She loves to look out over the balcony at our dismal highway view and bird watch. She also loves to watch my partner and I do what we do: stare at our laptops on the couch, walk back and forth from the fridge, mill about aimlessly both literally and figuratively. And while cat care might not always translate into self-care, I have to say, seeing her joy is almost as good as having the window seat myself.

—Kris Seavers, IRL editor

Work Slack

“do you want dry egg?”

David Covucci, tech and politics editor, on this wet egg tweet

Now playing: MisterWives — “SUPERBLOOM”

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Must-reads on the Daily Dot

Impossible expectations: Black influencers and the limitations of relatability
Marvel fans want Shuri to be recast due to Letitia Wright’s anti-vax views
Rittenhouse judge’s phone accidentally going off causes online freakout—as some claim it’s Trump anthem
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*First Published: Sep 17, 2020, 5:37 pm CDT