Surprise: Connected, camera-wielding vibrator can be hacked

It took men declaring dress codes sexist for people to finally listen
When boys complain about having to wear pants, it goes viral. When women complain about being shamed, silence.

See all Editor's Picks

Photo via Svakom

No one could have possibly predicted this would happen.

Well, we can’t say we didn’t see this Internet of Things snafu coming. Using rudimentary techniques, U.K. security firm easily hacked into a $249 connected vibrator. On top of being able to control the device, the vibrator is outfitted with a camera, so a hacker could also watch its video stream unbeknownst to the user.

The vibrator, the Svakom Siime Eye, connects over Wi-Fi with ridiculously minimal security—its default password is “88888888.” The device has a camera at one end so that while you’re using it, you can also stream video of yourself, or a dildo-eye-view of the action. With its lack of security, however, anyone within range could easily tap into that stream. A hacker could also get admin access to its web server and gain full control of the device, whether or not the hacker was within Wi-Fi range.

Pen Test Partners, the company that discovered this vulnerability, reached out to Svakom about this issue beginning in December, but hasn’t yet gotten a response. Pen Test advises Siime Eye owners to immediately change the password on their device from its default—or toss out the gadget and “never use it again.”

The security of Internet of Things devices is definitely one of its biggest flaws. Devices from light bulbs to refrigerators are vulnerable to being exploited, having backdoors installed, or enabling thieves to break into home. And it’s not just malicious hackers who are able to take advantage of such things. Just last month, We-Vibe, another smart sex-toy maker, was ordered to pay customers $4 million after the company was found to be collecting owners’ usage statistics without their knowledge.

When something is connected to the internet, you’re opening that device up to being hacked and tracked, no matter how well-meaning its manufacturer is. So if you prefer to keep your sexual exploits private, your best bet is to stick with an old-fashioned, “dumb,” non-connected toy.

H/T NYMag

From Our VICE Partners

Pure, uncut internet. Straight to your inbox.