New York Times tweets, quickly deletes poll over Christine Blasey Ford’s credibility

After Christine Blasey Ford recalled how Brett Kavanaugh, as a teenager, held her down on a bed at a get together, attempted to take her clothes off, and covered her mouth as she screamed, Ford’s voice shaking as she relived her trauma before the Senate Judiciary Committee and tens of thousands of people watching at home, the New York Times opinion section wanted to know one thing: Did Twitter find Ford’s testimony credible?

Yes, this was a real question that the Twitter account for the paper’s oft-criticized opinion section posed to the internet, as if the court of public opinion had not already been in session since before Ford’s identity was revealed less than two weeks ago.

The poll, which has since been deleted, asked voters to voice whether they felt Ford’s testimony was credible, giving options for “yes,” “no,” and “unsure.”

After deleting the tweet, the opinion account shared an image of the offensive poll, with the caption, “We’re sorry for this tweet. In retrospect, a Twitter poll is insensitive in light of the gravity of this hearing. We’ve deleted it.”

While the tweet was live for less than four hours, it only garnered a few thousand votes, with a majority of critics tweeting directly at the Times social media account to express their opinion.

And while the Times’ opinion account did apologize, few people were satisfied by the apology, because, well, the poll was shared in the first place.

Sorry, New York Times. Perhaps the internet is done with armchair analysis about a woman’s believability when it comes to recounting her experience with sexual assault.

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso

Samantha Grasso is a former IRL staff writer for the Daily Dot with a reporting emphasis on immigration. Her work has appeared on Los Angeles Magazine, Death And Taxes, Revelist, Texts From Last Night, Austin Monthly, and she has previously contributed to Texas Monthly.