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Racist, sexually explicit content tweeted from Buffalo Wild Wings account

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The Buffalo Wild Wings Twitter account was compromised Friday evening, leading to a series of tweets posted from the account spouting racist and sexually explicit content.

Following the tweets’ removal, a Buffalo Wild Wings spokesperson confirmed to the Daily Dot that the account was hacked and said the company is seeking action against the hacker(s).

“We’re sorry that our fans had to see those awful posts, which obviously did not come from us,” the spokesperson said. “We are in touch with our Twitter representatives and will pursue the appropriate action against the individuals involved.”

The inappropriate tweets were deleted within minutes but have been preserved on internet archives and in screenshots. Two of the messages included the N-word and another made a reference to “cum.”

Buffalo Wild Wings Twitter screenshot @BWWings/Twitter

One tweet posted during the hack included a photo of a person with a scarf covering their face. It is unclear whether the person pictured was involved in the hack.

Buffalo Wild Wings Twitter screenshot @BWWings/Twitter

As the uncharacteristic tweets rolled in from the company’s account, people on Twitter joked about the incident.

For some, the incident was far more serious. Tariq Nasheed, a film producer, called for a personal apology from Buffalo Wild Wings after one of the now-tweets described him as a “racist coon.”

Update 10:17pm CT, June 1: Buffalo Wild Wings posted an apology message to its Twitter followers late Friday evening, saying the hack “wasn’t funny.”

Kris Seavers

Kris Seavers

Kris Seavers is the Evening Editor for the Daily Dot, where she covers breaking news, politics, and LGBTQ issues. Her work has appeared in Central Texas publications, including Austin Monthly and San Antonio Magazine, and on NPR.