Firefox founder one-ups ‘Silicon Valley’ with his own hilarious script

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Silicon Valley

Nicely done, Blake Ross. Let’s hope HBO is paying attention.

The brilliance of HBO’s Silicon Valley is its pitch-perfect satire of a tech industry that struggles with its own lack of self-awareness. But one tech executive just proved that the Valley has a funny bone after all—by writing his own Silicon Valley script.

Blake Ross, founder of Firefox who has worked at many of the major tech corporations including Netscape, AOL, and Facebook, posted his screenplay on Facebook

“I couldn’t wait 8 more months for season 3 of Silicon Valley to start, so I spent the past 48 hours writing my own episode,” Ross wrote. “It picks up where season 2 left off.”

The dialogue is hilarious, complete with subtle-yet-harsh jabs at the tech industry. He embraces the characters’ personalities and the script reads like something fresh out of the HBO writer’s room. Though Ross does note that it’s his first attempt at a television script, you can hardly tell because it’s just that great.

Ross takes on tech’s lack of diversity, the ousting of a CEO and the weird interview questions for a replacement, and open source and copyright with a really clever tongue. We’ve clipped some of our favorite bits, but you can read the whole 31 pages here

Blake Ross

Blake Ross

Blake Ross

Blake Ross

And the icing on the cake? Ross released these pages while the techies are all off playing in the desert at Burning Man. Here’s to hoping this actually becomes an episode. 

H/T TechCrunch | Photo via HBO/YouTube

Selena Larson

Selena Larson

Selena Larson is a technology reporter based in San Francisco who writes about the intersection of technology and culture. Her work explores new technologies and the way they impact industries, human behavior, and security and privacy. Since leaving the Daily Dot, she's reported for CNN Money and done technical writing for cybersecurity firm Dragos.