Elon Musk’s strange tweets have become tech’s greatest mystery

elon musk the boring company twitter tunnel

Screengrab via Y Combinator/Youtube

Is he serious?

Elon Musk is continuing to tease out his new mysterious tunneling company, which he now claims will go operational in, “a month or so.”

He even gave a location for the first build.

The first mention of this unknown company sprouted up last month. Fed up with being stuck in his car all day, Musk experienced an epiphany, and shortly after remembered how good he is at starting companies. 

The goal of the company is to reduce congestion on roads by digging tunnels, and as Musk so triumphantly announced on Twitter, “It shall be called ‘The Boring Company.’”

It’s becoming a familiar phenomenon: Someone with power and money gets angry, tweets about anger and what needs to be done, and then starts doing it. The thing is, no one is really sure if this is actually going to happen, but Musk continues to play it out.

The well-respected inventor’s idea started out with a bit of playfulness: a knee-jerk reaction, a silly name, and even this painstakingly crafted tagline:

But then things started to get real. Musk remembered who he was, and what he is capable of.

Until yesterday, we had all but forgotten about what first seemed a playful joke.

We’re still not sure if the founder of Tesla is yanking all of our chains, or if he is indeed going to start building a tunnel outside his Space X office near Los Angeles next month. Such an operation would require a lot of paperwork, and a level of government efficiency we’re just not sure exists. 

It could be Musk has been planning this all along, and was going for a big reveal. Whatever the case, the Boring Company is already proving less boring than being stuck in traffic.

H/T Motherboard

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy

Phillip Tracy is a former technology staff writer at the Daily Dot. He's an expert on smartphones, social media trends, and gadgets. He previously reported on IoT and telecom for RCR Wireless News and contributed to NewBay Media magazine. He now writes for Laptop magazine.