THINX (BTWN) are period panties aimed at teens–and they’re great

THINX

It’s the same period-proof underwear you know and love (just somewhat smaller).

The demand for more inclusive, sustainable alternatives to traditional period products like period panties has exploded in recent years. In response, one major retailer launched THINX (BTWN). It’s the first collection of period-proof panties designed specifically for adolescents.

Using the same trusted technology as regular THINX period panties, the (BTWN) collection allows young people of all shapes and sizes to continue living their active lives while avoiding leaks, chafing, and the like.

How does THINX (BTWN) work?

Each pair of (BTWN) period panties is designed to hold about three and a half regular tampons or 17mL worth of fluid. Depending on the ferocity of your flow, you can choose to wear the underwear on its own or with other products for extra protection. On your lighter days, you can confidently slide ’em on and continue with your day. And then if things get heavy, just add a menstrual cup or tampon to the mix (or pack a clean pair to change into) and you’ll be good to go.

THINX recommends that you wear the period panties at home to adjust to how they work with your body.

Are period panties hygienic?

Unlike regular cotton underwear, the (BTWN) period panties quickly absorb, trap, and dry up any moisture. This leaves you free from leaks, odors, and stains and makes the underwear easy to clean (and yes, hygienic)!

period panties THINX

With proper care, each pair of panties can last for two years. Follow these simple care instructions to get the most out of yours.

Step 1: Rinse by hand after use.

Step 2:  Wash with the rest of your laundry in either cold or warm water. DO NOT USE fabric softener or bleach because it will ruin the period-proofing technology.

Step 3: Hang ’em up to dry.

Why buy THINX (BTWN) period panties?

Besides the obvious reasons:

  • You’re spending way too much on throw-away period products.
  • Disposable menstruation products are polluting the environment.
  • Pads and pantiliners are really annoying!

Using a super comfortable, trusted product like period panties improves the relationship between the uterus and its owner. Instead of being bothered by the additional weight and barely flexible diaper feeling we refer to as “pads,” the (BTWN) collection lets your bits breathe. You may forget you’re even bleeding (well, that might be an overstatement, but you will be free from the infamous menstruation march).

period panties

And from ever having to discreetly detach a pad from your inner thigh by doin’ a lil dance.

period panties

You can also say goodbye to those awful frontal wedgies! THINX’s moisture-wicking material prevents the swamp-like conditions that heavier cotton encourages.

period panties

All of which makes having your period so much less of a hassle, and more of an awe-inspiring realization of just how strong and incredible your body is.

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Where can I get (BTWN) panties?

The (BTWN) period panties collection is available in three cuts: Shorty, Bikini, and Brief. Each style comes in a variety of sizes and patterns and is available through the THINX site for $23/pair. Or you can try one of each design in the Fresh Start Period Kit for $59 – which saves you approximately $4/pair.

Interested in buying some for yourself? THINX’s line of alternative adult period products starts at $24 and includes items like thongs, briefs, bikinis, leotards, training shorts, and more! And if for some unlikely reason you decide you don’t like the period panties, you have 60 days to return them for a full refund.

Shop the full collection here

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Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale specializes in NSFW culture, audio gear, and photography. A former editorial and photo director for Spoon University at SUNY New Paltz, her work has been featured in the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, Post-Trash, the New Paltz Oracle, and the Legislative Gazette.