How to shoot professional photography with your smartphone

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You don’t need an expensive camera for professional-looking photos.

Smartphones come with impressive cameras that have the ability to shoot incredibly clear photos and videos. But there’s more to photography than just counting megapixels.

There are other important factors to consider in the mission for high-quality photography, such as the lens quality, the sensor, the amount of available light, and the ability to focus quickly. There are some things you just can’t control when taking photos with your smartphone, but that doesn’t mean you can’t snap professional quality pics.

Listed below are some smartphone camera accessories that’ll help you become the photographer you’ve always dreamed of (or at least boost your Instagram cred.)

The best mobile photography tips for amateur photographers

1) Set the mood with a portable mini-Speedlite

First off, the amount of available light can really make a difference when it comes to capturing clear and detailed photos and videos. Especially when you take megapixels into account. This baby simply plugs into your headphone jack and provides you with the same color temperature as professional xenon flashes. Capture natural-looking skin tones, soft shadows and the correct depth without red eyes. Nocturnal photography is no longer a hassle.

Price: $6.99+

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2) Switch up your perspective with a lens kit

smartphone photography Amazon

Since using the correct lens can make all the difference, pro cameras have an option to switch out lenses. Smartphones do not … until now! This universal lens kit that gives you the option to shoot close-ups and wide-angle photos or video. With nine lenses to choose from (zoom, 0.36X wide-angle, 0.63X wide lens, 15X macro lens,  20X macro lens, 198° fisheye, kaleidoscope, starburst lens, and a telephoto lens),  just clip the desired lens onto your smartphone and see the difference!

Price: $16.99

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3) Steady your focus with a tripod

iphone photography Photo via Amazon

Shaky hands make for blurry photography. Try a tripod and give a clearer definition to “still frame” shooting. The Camkix adjustable tripod grows to 6.25” and allows you to shoot in both landscape and portrait mode. It even comes with a Bluetooth remote, making it perfect for self-portraits and group photos!

Price: $9.79

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4) Opting for video? Record crystal-clear sound with a mic

Videography can be pretty pointless if the moving pictures are inaudible — unless that’s what you’re going for! Luckily, microphones exist, even for your smartphone. This one by POP Voice is omnidirectional, meaning it can pick up sound from any direction, not just where it’s aimed. Simply plug the mic into your headphone jack and start recording high-quality audio files no matter where you are.

Price: $12.98

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5) Add depth to your shots with a waterproof case

smartphone photography Amazon

You can take your iPhone a step further, or at least a few feet under, with a waterproof and photo-optimized case. IPX8 certified, this universal smartphone dry pouch by MPOW is an Amazon bestseller and comes highly rated by reviewers.  

Price: $6.59+

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6) Turn your artwork into high-quality prints

iphone photography Photo via Amazon

The last step in taking quality photos is showing them off. Emailing pictures to your computer compresses the file, which affects the quality. And regular computer printers just don’t do your photographs justice, even when you use photo paper. Fujifilm found a solution to both of those problems. Using the Fujifilm Instax Share smartphone printer, you can automatically print your photographs just by connecting to Wi-Fi. The printer provides you with a variety of templates to easily print your photos.

Price: $179.99

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Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale specializes in NSFW culture, audio gear, and photography. A former editorial and photo director for Spoon University at SUNY New Paltz, her work has been featured in the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, Post-Trash, the New Paltz Oracle, and the Legislative Gazette.