This unisex vibrator is the future of sex

Presented by MysteryVibe

As long as adult toy manufacturers have been in the market of selling sex toys, they’ve done so using gendered marketing. The reasoning for it was largely in response to the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and 1970s. But as our definition of gender widens beyond just male and female, our sex toys need to do the same.

MysteryVibe, a sexual health company, is inventing category-defining products that combine the best of humanity and technology to elevate the pleasure experience. Their flagship product, Crescendo, bends and adjusts to the users shape for personalized pleasure, making it truly unisex and universal, for both singles and couples.  

History of the vibrator

Vibrators were first released for public consumption in the late 1800s but remained a medical device until the mid-20th century. This allowed women to buy them for home, instead of having to see a doctor for “hysteria treatment.” Big-name household appliance manufacturers even started marketing the products as a way to relieve headaches, aching muscles, and even provide you with glowing skin.

When the devices made their film debut in the 1920s, vibrators went from nonsexual, medical devices to something too provocative to acknowledge. In reaction to the outlandishness of it all (as well as many other prejudices), the 1960s and ‘70s women’s liberation movement (WLM) brought a wave of sexual freedom, feminism, and vibrators for masturbation. Finally, pleasure became the basis for the use of sex toys (then called marital aids) and in the late 1970s, the first adult toy shops opened to sell these devices exclusively.

 mysteryvibe crescendo Babeland  

Fast forward about a half of a century later, despite what we know about sexual health, the diversity of pleasure, gender identity, fluidity, and sexuality in general, many major sex toy companies still advertise products with binary gender in mind. Consequently, consumers find silly phrases like “Voted the best vibrator for women” and “Guaranteed to make him last longer!” plastered all over our sex toy packaging. This marketing practice is not only sexist but also erases the identities of the transgender and nonbinary communities.

Why is it so hard for sex toy companies to be inclusive? MysteryVibe says it’s not, and the company is proving it with the body-adapting vibrator, Crescendo.

Why the Crescendo vibrator is the future of sex toys

As soon as I unboxed Crescendo, it was clear that it’s made to an incredibly high standard. To the touch, it’s super soft–dare I say silky? Sizing in at 8.5 inches long allows for it to be shaped into a number of different positions. But because it’s designed with premium silicone and not jelly rubber or polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it’s non-toxic, unlikely to cause irritation, nonporous, and totally lube-safe. Just remember not to use the toy with (or store it near) any products that are also silicone-based or you risk degradation.  

mysteryvibe crescendo MysteryVibe

Conceptually, Crescendo is kind of like an all-in-one vibrator capable of prostate, G-spot, clitoral, and nipple stimulation (just to name a few). In addition to its versatility, the device itself is completely customizable for everyone’s body parts. Its flexible design allows users to bend it however they see fit, which is optimal for people just starting to explore their bodies (as well as those with a specific target in mind). The TL;DR here is: Crescendo allows users to discover a range of often ignored pleasure points.

This feature alone sets it apart from many of the stereotypical vibrators we see that attempt to replicate phallic symbols or oversexualize genitalia. Because not everyone’s anatomy is exactly the same, having the ability to customize a vibrator to work with your body is a total game changer! The flexibility of Crescendo also ensures endless hours of fun whether you’re playing alone or with a partner.

Unlike other adult toys that cater to a cisnormative lifestyle (or the assumption that a person’s gender identity matches their biological sex), MysteryVibe Crescendo was created with individual satisfaction in mind; since the word “pleasure” doesn’t have a one-size-fits-all definition.

Other perks of using the Crescendo

Crescendo is smarter than the average vibrator because it works in conjunction with an app that can be used to enhance the user experience. I downloaded the MysteryVibe app for free just to see what it was about and once I was able to connect my device, I unlocked a library full of options. Users are able to create their own vibration patterns, change the order of patterns saved on their device, and even control the toy with their phone as the remote (from up to 10 meters away).

mysteryvibe MysteryVibe

What’s more is that the Crescendo takes advantage of induction charging technology which makes it 100% waterproof (unlike other toys that are only made to be “splash proof”), so you can fully submerge the device in your tub with confidence and clean it without worry.

I also noticed that the Crescendo includes a sleek, sexy black satin storage case, made complete with pocket storage for the charger and USB cable. Simply slide the vibrator into the case, and tuck it away in your backpack, purse, or luggage and no one will know any better. This must be what people mean when they say “travel in style.”

Where to buy the Crescendo

If you’re ready for a toy that aims to transcend gender norms and allows you to explore during both solo and partner play, MysteryVibe Crescendo is for you. You can snap up one of these lovely sex objects on the MysteryVibe site for $149.99. You’ll get a 12-month warranty, a choice of two beautiful colors (blue and purple), and best of all, the pleasure of knowing that no matter who you invite into your bedroom, you have the perfect toy for the job.

BUY ON MYSTERYVIBE

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Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale specializes in NSFW culture, audio gear, and photography. A former editorial and photo director for Spoon University at SUNY New Paltz, her work has been featured in the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, Post-Trash, the New Paltz Oracle, and the Legislative Gazette.