The Holga 120N is the $40 camera you never knew you needed

Amazon

Oh, snap!

If you’re looking for a nifty lil’ film camera to take on a trip (or just have fun with), look no further. The Holga 120N plastic film camera is pretty much any photographers godsend.

Whether you’re a pro or a novice, this baby doesn’t care. It’s so simplistic that anyone could use it. All you have to do is load in the film, wind it up, point and shoot – it’s really that simple.

holga Amazon

Best of all, it’s so compact and lightweight that it’s perfect for traveling. I flew from New York City to San Diego and back with this in my carry-on and not only did it hold up, but it made my trip that much more fun. It may be plastic and not have a flash, but this little cam can take some seriously beautiful photos.

I have to admit, with a plastic lens I was a little worried that the pictures would come out distorted or blurry. Boy oh boy, was I wrong.

The camera features three focal options: portrait, large group, and landscape. You also have a switch setting for sunny or overcast skies. As long as you’re shooting with some sun, you’ll end up with some marvelous medium format photos. You can even add your own artistic edge by taking multiple shots on a single exposure. So for clarity’s sake, since there’s no flash it’s not recommended you use this in the dark or at night – unless you plan to develop a roll of blanks. Besides that, there are no setbacks.

The Holga 120N plastic film camera is currently on sale through Amazon for just $37+ (regularly $40+). Although it doesn’t come with film, you can use any brand of 120mm that you like. I’ve used both rolls of Fujifilm and Kodak and had excellent results, so it all comes down to your own preference.

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Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale

Marisa Losciale specializes in NSFW culture, audio gear, and photography. A former editorial and photo director for Spoon University at SUNY New Paltz, her work has been featured in the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies, Post-Trash, the New Paltz Oracle, and the Legislative Gazette.