There is now a summer camp for cool teens who want to be YouTube stars

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Photo by Miguel Vieira/Wikimedia

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BY GEOFF WEISS

Camp seems to be the de facto destination for the YouTube set as of late. Following the news that bold-faced stars like Tyler Oakley and Bethany Mota will serve as “camp counselors” at a new seven-day meetup conceived by live events company Mills Entertainment, another camp has just been announced with an eye toward churning out young YouTube stars.

2bcamp, to be hosted this summer in Madrid, Spain, is the creation of 2btube, a new media company specializing in Spanish-speaking creators, and Enforcex, a creator of international summer camps. Aimed at young people ages 11 to 18, the two-week experience will teach aspiring YouTubers how to create channels, generate quality content, grow audiences, promote videos, and collaborate. Lessons will be helmed by 2btube’s staff, which the company says has been honing its expertise “for the past six months.”

The program also teaches attendees—who must come equipped with a camera and a laptop—how to use management platforms, how to conceive and design their personal branding, and how to light and edit their videos.

Students can choose to either board at the facility, at Spain’s University Francisco de Vitoria, or attend during the day and spend evenings and weekends at home. In addition to the YouTube tips, students will also be able to hone their English-language skills and participate in other team-building activities that aim to help develop empathy and conflict resolution, according to the company—both of which it says are key qualities in operating a successful YouTube channel. By the end of the event, all of the various groups within the camp will have live YouTube channels.

“Many parents have told us that their children want to be YouTubers,” said 2btube Executive Chairman Bastian Manintveld in a statement. “Being a successful YouTuber requires passion, commitment and responsibility—all values ​​we want to instill in a fun and international environment.”

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