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Every actor has a part they're born to play.

There’s been quite an uproar on the interwebs lately about white actors being cast in roles originated by Asians.

But this outrage seems a bit much considering white people have been playing Asians in movies forever—and doing it quite well. There’s no reason to cast Rinko Kikuchi as Motoko in Ghost in the Shell when Scarlett Johansson can bring her white-girl flavor to the role. In fact, more white people should steal roles from other Asian actors, because why not? 

Here are some Caucasian actors who deserve this opportunity.

1) Tom Cruise as Genghis Khan

He has experience playing a samurai and has been the face of Scientology for years, so starring as the brutal emperor of the Mongol Empire should be a breeze for him.

2) Jennifer Lawrence as Madame Butterfly

#JenniferLawrence #MockingjayUK 😍

A photo posted by Jennifer Lawrence (@jenniferlawrencepx) on

David O. Russell can direct, and she’ll probably win an Oscar.

3) Matthew Mcconaughey as Jackie Chan

The Hong Kong-raised, world-renowned martial artist and actor is due for a biopic. Who better to play him than a white guy from Texas?

4) Martha Stewart as Rei Kawakubo

Rei Kawakubo built her fashion empire in the '60s as the founder of Comme des Garçons. Martha Stewart kinda did the same thing. This casting choice is a no-brainer.

5) This baby as Amy Tan

Photo via meteo021/Fotolia © (Used with permission)

Only a Caucasian newborn could pull off a role like this.

6) Gerard Butler as literally any Asian person

He’s just coming off of Gods of Egypt, in which he played a pretty convincing Egyptian, so Hollywood should give him a chance to play the role of an Asian person. Seriously, what’s the point of casting someone of Asian descent when there are so many white people available? 
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