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Listen closely.

If you run a Christian hotline and you’re not up to speed on pop culture, you may have some unintentional prayer requests on your hands.

The Internet is no stranger to trolling televangelists, and this gem from 2011 shows just how easy it is for your bogus emailed prayer request to get read on-air. At first glance, the first prayer is the story of a troubled youth who’s gotten mixed in with the wrong crowd while growing up in Philadelphia.

Some of the words are changed, but listen closely enough and you just might recognize something a little more iconic. And it’s not the only one that flies by on the air.

The one personality takes it in good stride once he recognizes what it’s about, but his partner doesn’t as much, especially after getting another prayer request for Will’s cousin Carlton and Uncle Phil, who are both having trouble finding a job.

“In fact, I’ve probably had about 10 hoax emails, and I can actually delete them faster than you can write them, so they won’t be read out,” she said. “But if it causes entertainment to you, then do carry on sending them because it takes me half a second to delete them.”

People may be watching the show, but they might soon get a lot more creative prayer requests on their hands.

Photo via Esther Gibbons/Flickr

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