If you're just waking up from a 30 year nap, The Daily Dot would like to inform you that today's date is Dec. 12, 2012—12/12/12—and it's a big day for people who like making something out of nothing in an effort to get themselves through the week.

Across the Internet, people are talking about 12/12/12, writing 12/12/12, and otherwise noting how a day like this won't come up again for another 90 years, when Jan. 1, 2101 rolls around and we can all revel in the wonders of 1/1/1—if the Mayans don't get to us first!

On Vimeo, one organization is using the unique date to make some pretty high-concept art. The group’s called One Day on Earth, and its mission is to document snippets of individuals’ lives as they traverse through the wonders of 12/12/12. The group did the same thing last year on Nov. 11, and again before that on Oct. 10, 2010.

Here's One Day's explanation of the project:

"On December 12th, 12.12.12, across the planet, documentary filmmakers, students, and other inspired citizenswil record the human experience over a 24-hour period and contribute their voice to the third annual global day of media creation called One Day on Earth. Together, we will create a shared archive and a film."

Sounds great. What's even better is that it's easy to get involved. Just film something before midnight—no porn or violence, basically follow Vimeo's Community Guidelines—and upload it to One Day on Earth. The full guidelines are here: Remember to state your name and state at the beginning of the video.

Film for five seconds or 15 minutes, or however long you'd like. In a month, One Day will emerge from the cutting room with a video that looks a lot like this.

It's already nearing 9am PT as of the time of this story's filing, so you've only got about 13 hours left. People! Grab your cameras and go!

Correction: The Daily Dot originally reported that One Day on Earth was a YouTube project. It was founded on Vimeo in 2008. We regret the error.

Photo via One Day on Earth/Vimeo