breakIn
A Google security researcher ran the numbers in a post on his personal blog.

Look at the person to your left. Now look at the person to your right. Now look at two more people.

One of you has had an online account compromised.

According to security researcher Elie Bursztein, 18.4 percent of U.S. Internet users have had had at least one of their online accounts broken into. More than a third of those who responded, 6.4 percent overall, have had it happen to multiple accounts.

Bursztein, who spends his days seeking out and fixing privacy and security issues for Google, wrote on his personal blog that he set up a Google Customer Survey, gauging how frequently users lose exclusive access to their accounts. "This is a much higher percentage than I imagined," he wrote.

Surveying over 10,000 people, Bursztein noted that there was no gender correlation with someone's likelihood of compromised security. There was, however, a bit of an income gap: The poorer someone is, the progressively greater the chance they'll be hacked. Bursztein found that 13.2 percent of those who make $24,999 had had an account compromised. For every additional $25,000 a year his respondents made, they were between one and three percentage points more likely to be secure. Those who made $100,000 a year did the best with security; only 5.2 percent of them reported being hacked.

"[I]t emphasizes how pervasive account compromises are," Bursztein noted.

He offered advice to offset these numbers: "In my experience one of the best strategies to help keep the accounts you care about secure is to provide the online service with your phone number for extra verification purposes."

Photo via Pixabay.com

 

Promoted Stories Powered by Sharethrough
Society
Facebook shocked that a woman runs I F*cking Love Science
When the owner of the most popular science page on Facebook revealed her identity the other day, the reaction was sadly predictable. "OMG GIRL," came the crescendo of comments from dumbfounded men (and a few women). It was as if Elise Andrew had infiltrated a 19th century scientific conference and suddenly ripped off a fake mustache in front of the assembled muttering menfolk. Cue pipes falling from open mouths. Shock! Awe! A woman!
security
Department of Homeland Security wants you to disable Java
You’ve probably heard that Java has a significant flaw, a “zero-day vulnerability,” that can allow hackers to root around in your computer. You’ve probably also heard that Oracle released a patch on Sunday. Case closed.
The Latest From Daily Dot Video
Group

Pure, uncut internet. Straight to your inbox.

Thanks for subscribing to our newsletter!