Ron Paul has found what he is going to do with that social media and Internet popularity he has enjoyed.

He's going to save the Internet.

At least that's what the Texas Congressman, who is serving out his last term in the House of Representatives, plans on doing with the release of “The Technology Revolution: A Campaign for Liberty Manifesto.” The four-page document was given to BuzzFeed earlier this week and was expected to be more formally released later on by Paul's Campaign for Liberty. It was co-authored by Paul's son Rand, who represents Kentucky in the Senate.

The manifesto calls for absolutely no regulation of the Internet, stating “As a matter of principle, we oppose any attempt by Government to tax, regulate, monitor or control the Internet, and we oppose the Internet collectivists who collaborate with the government against Internet freedom” The document takes dead aim at legislative moves like the Stop Online Privacy Act, which failed earlier this year, but as pointed out by techdirt.com, it also criticizes what it calls “progressive do-gooders,” who support “Internet freedom” but who view corporate influences to be just as dangerous as government ones.

The short version of the document is basically this: The Internet will regulate itself just like a free-market would, and government should “get out of the way.”

But will anything come of this? According to sources close to the father-son team, the answer is yes. Staffers told BuzzFeed that as soon as a vote in the House takes place on Paul's bill to audit the Federal Reserve, the Congressman will take on Internet freedom. But even if he does decide to move forward with legislation in the final months of his time in Washington, don't expect much of it. Paul has a weak track record when it comes to successful legislation. In nearly 22 years, Paul has sponsored 620 bills in the House of Representatives and only one has ever passed.

And, for now, all Paul and his son have written is a “manifesto”—not actual legislation. Interestingly, there is no mention of the document on either Ron or Rand’s Facebook. Could that change in a few weeks? Only time will tell if Paul's “Technology Revolution” will be his legacy.

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