email
This proposed international holiday is going to straight to our spam filter. 

Here’s a bad idea: Send No Email Day.

Someone is fed up with the nature of email, and he or she has decided to rage against the e-machine. Send-no-email-day.com delares October 10 the “Day of No Email,” and while (currently) 55 Twitter users have given their blessing, it seems as though a promise of abstaining from electronic mail is not something people can truly give.

That’s because email is embedded not only in the majority of peoples’ personal lives but also, more importantly, their professional ones. We can’t quite walk into work on Oct. 10, refusing to function from 10am to 11am, as the site suggests: “It’s ‘Day of No Email’, didn’t you hear? I’m taking lunch...early.”

Maybe this site’s maestro should just set-up better mail filters? “EVERYONE HATES EMAIL BECAUSE IT NEVER F**KING STOPS,” they write in booming caps lock.

“IT JUST KEEPS COMING, LIKE A TEXT-BASED MICHAEL MYERS THAT, INSTEAD OF KILLING YOU, IS JUST SUPER DEMANDING OF YOUR TIME.”

A Whois Lookup offers little to the identity of the frustrated emailer, aside from a California locale. So No Email Day’s hour-long “email free zone” will officially be 10 to 11am Pacific Time, in case you were wondering.

“LET'S ALL TAKE A BREAK. SEPARATELY, BUT TOGETHER. LET'S DO BETTER THINGS. LET'S BE HUMAN.LET'S JUST NOT DO IT. AT LEAST. JUST FOR A BIT. JUST FOR A WHILE. JUST FOR AN HOUR.”

We’ll expect to hear from you at 11am.

Photo via Send No Email Day

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