With 30 million unique visitors and close to 2 billion page views a month, it's safe to say a lot happens on the link-sharing and discussion site Reddit every day. There are more than90,000 sections on the site; a single discussion alone can sometimes attract more than 10,000 comments.

How can anyone keep track of it all? Our daily Reddit Digest highlights the most interesting or important discussions from around the site—every morning.

  • The best part of reading /r/science is the constant debunking of sensational science writing. One of yesterday's top links had a typically over-the-top headline: "Pentagon-supported physicists on Wednesday said they had devised a 'time cloak' that briefly makes an event undetectable." r/science's debunking of the article and headline is thorough and entertaining. It's too bad, because the experiment itself is really interesting. "Great science, shit article," wsw2012 writes. (/r/science)

  • Ever heard of 9GAG? It's an image hosting site that basically collects all of Reddit's image memes into one place and stamps a 9GAG watermark on everything. In /r/TheoryOfReddit, planaxis has an interesting analysis of one of the worst places on the Internet, including this gem of descriptive analysis: "9GAG celebrates a concentrated derivative of Reddit's trivial stupidity." (/r/TheoryOfReddit)

  • Redditor sah0605 asks: "What are some of your daily observations that remind you that we live 'in the future?'" (/r/AskReddit)

  • A World War II veteran is doing an AMA (his 25-year-old grandson transcribes). (/r/IAmA)

  • A redditor responds to Stop Online Piracy Act coauthor Lamar Smith's challenge (to Reddit): "There’s nothing they can point to that does what they say it does do. I think their fears are unfounded.” In a six-minute video, redditor Inuma proves him wrong. Unfortunately, I don't think Lamar Smith is actually listening. (/r/SOPA)