Turns out steamy messages and indiscreet photos aren't the only secretive transmissions being sent via Snapchat.

This past weekend, London-based Betfair–the world's largest online betting exchange–became the first known bookmaker to issue odds through Snapchat, the popular social network that's made a name for itself by allowing users to send "self-destructing" messages.

In a first-of-its-kind promotion, Betfair sent exclusive odds to followers of its Snapchat account that were only visible for a few seconds before being deleted. Betfair used the messaging app to alert subscribers to special odds related to a parlay on two weekend soccer matches in the U.K. The games in question involved Chelsea vs. Everton and Crystal Palace vs. Manchester United in the Barclays Premier League.

According to Casino.org, wagering on favorites Chelsea and Manchester both to win in their respective matches came with a 6:4 odds for most betters. But followers of the official Snapchat account were given access to a secret set of odds and allowed to wager up to £10 ($16.65) on the outcome. Up to 500 Betfair clients were allow to wager on the "enhanced odds." It's not clear what the terms of this exclusive bet were.

Snapchat, for those not familiar with the service, allows users to send photo messages to other users that come with a countdown clock to automatically delete from the recipient's phone seconds after being opened. It's encouraged many to share racy or embarrassing photos with the implication that the images won't be permanent. Although, it's become fairly obvious in the past year that Snapchat cannot guarantee total security.

With Snapchat's countdown clock is seemingly designed to encourage impulsive behavior, it's not terribly surprising that the gaming industry would take a shine to it.

Leading up to the promotion, Betfair Brand Director Mark Ody told British newspapers that, "We are hugely excited about exploring the potential of Snapchat as a marketing tool, and one that seemed a perfect fit for us as a brand with technology and innovation at our heart."

Photo by Itaru Chiba/Flickr