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Anonymous doxes Brazilian model who exploited hurricane wreckage

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Hacker collective Anonymous has released the personal information of a Brazilian model accused of exploiting the Hurricane Sandy destruction for a photoshoot.

After Sandy passed over New York City last week, Nana Gouvea and her husband took to the streets of the beleaguered city to stage an impromptu photoshoot in the midst of the debris. Gouvea posed in front of wrecked cars and broken trees, trying to look as seductive as possible. She then uploaded the images to Facebook.

Needless to say, the inconsiderate photo session resulted in backlash for the model/actress. A single-serving Tumblr entitled “Nana Gouvea em Desasteres” (“Nana Goveau in Disasters”) was created so that individuals could photoshop the model into other well known tragic events like the Chernobyl meltdown, the Hindenburg disaster, and even Tiananmen Square. A Facebook group by the same name popped up on Oct. 31 and has received over 6,300 likes since its inception.

Equally upset at the model was Anonymous, who reacted to the insensitive images by doxing her on Saturday. The group released all of Gouvea’s personal information—including her address and Cadastro de Pessoas Física (CPF), Brazil’s version of a social security number— via Twitter.

“DOX on Brazilian model Nana Gouvêa for exploiting New York hurricane #Sandydevistation,” Anonymous tweeted via @YourAnonNews.

Gouvea responded to the release of her private information that same day via Twitter.”[T]his is bullying. You guys don’t know me and are not been[sic] fair. You cowards! Show your face and name you terrorists!!” she wrote.

Regardless of whether Gouvea deserved to be doxed or not, the model has been very adamant in claiming no wrongdoing. Not only that, but she seems to be enjoying the attention people are giving her, as if she subscribes to the adage that “any press is good press.” Her Facebook page, for example, is littered with links to various stories being written about the incident. These are often paired with the story’s country of origin and several exclamation marks.

Photo via Nana Gouvea em Desastres/Facebook