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Max Fleishman (Licensed)

A TV station streamed the standoff and shooting to over 40k viewers.

When a standoff in Bangkok was streamed over Facebook Live yesterday, more than 40,000 people ended up watching gunman Dr. Wanchai Danaitamonut shoot himself. He has now reportedly died from his injuries.

Danaitamonut, a university lecturer, is accused of killing two of his colleagues at Phranakhon Rajabhat University over a job dispute, according the Mirror U.K. As police arrived on the scene, Danaitamonut held up his gun, and negotiators were called to talk him down. While this was happening, local station Thairath TV streamed the standoff on Facebook Live.

According to one of Thairath TV’s Facebook updates, Danaitamonut shot himself during the livestream after the standoff had been going on for about five hours. The station's Facebook page noted, “Dr. Wanchai decided to shoot himself! The latter prevailed for more than five hours. Officials urged hospitalized.” (Translation done via Google Translate).

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Danaitamonut was rushed to the hospital, where, according to initial reports, he died from self-inflicted wounds. The Bangkok Post also obtained a document he reportedly threw at police, outlining his grievances against one of his victims.

As livestreaming becomes more accessible through services like Snapchat, Periscope, and Facebook Live, the number of violent incidents streamed through the services seems to have increased. Last week, a French girl threw herself in front of a train and streamed it over Periscope, and an Ohio woman has been indicted for livestreaming another woman’s rape.

For more information about suicide prevention or to speak with someone confidentially, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (U.S.) or Samaritans (U.K.). 

H/T Mirror U.K.

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