image upload

Photo via perfectlab / Shutterstock.com (Licensed) Remix by Max Fleishman

'She was scared of what the reaction might be from the Asian community in her area,' a detective said.

A 16-year-old girl took her own life after a private Instagram message was shared online, the U.K.'s Telegraph reported.

Phoebe Connop, who lived in a suburb of Birmingham in England, had reportedly been flirting with a boy of Indian or Pakistani descent (referred to as "Asian" in the U.K.) when she took a joke photo of herself with darkened skin and a scarf wrapped around her head. 

Connop sent the photo to her friends in a private Instagram message, along with a message saying that she would have to look like that in order to get approval from her love interest's parents.

According to Detective Sergeant Katherine Tomkins, who spoke at an inquest on Friday, the offending photo was then shared by Connop's friends.

"From speaking to her friends in the weeks following her death, we discovered that the image had circulated further than she wanted it to," Tomkins said as quoted by the Telegraph

Tomkins continued: "There had been some negative reaction and she confided in her friend, who did take the image down at her request, that she was scared of what the reaction might be from the Asian community in her area."

Connop committed suicide on July 7 at home, allegedly because she feared being branded as racist after the photo leaked.

The Telegraph did not mention whether anyone would face charges in the case related to public distribution of a privately shared photo.

In a similar case in the U.S. in April, a Missouri teen killed herself after classmates posted "mean" Facebook comments about her.

For more information about suicide prevention or to speak with someone confidentially, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (U.S.) or Samaritans (U.K.). 

Promoted Stories Powered by Sharethrough
IRL
How Facebook's suicide-prevention features work to prevent self-harm
Facebook is implementing new tools to help people who may be at risk of suicide. New features first available in the U.S. are rolling out globally to help people recognize and report potentially harmful behavior.
From Our VICE Partners
Group

Pure, uncut internet. Straight to your inbox.

Thanks for subscribing to our newsletter!