Kliprr” sounds like your typical web-sharing site: “Klip” what you want from the internet, the name suggests, and share it with your friends. The Google results for “Kliprr” seem to confirm this, describing it as a site that “lets you organize, collaborate and share all the things you love from the web with others in a unique, vibrant, and colourful way.”

Click through, though, and you might be a bit surprised. Kliprr’s front page is smattered with graphic pornography, the headline revealing the site’s true nature: “Klip and save erotica you love from anywhere on the web.”

 

Certainly “vibrant” and “colorful,” Kilprr allows users to save and share erotica, conveniently sorting it not only by genre (from “blonde” to “threesome”), but also by price. If the site’s front page feels a lot like Pinterest, that’s not an accident. Kliprr’s Twitter bio reads: “Kliprr is your PINTEREST FOR EROTICA...”

Kliprr “is intended to appeal to both men and women,” a representative from the site acknowledged over email. “Many erotic pictures contain the same ingredients as pornography but the difference is that [they are] artistic, [bringing] creativity and beauty and interest other than straight sexual ‘getting your rocks off.’”

And while Kliprr’s front page is plastered with X-rated images (many of them tagged as “porn”), Kliprr argues that “on the other hand, what is arousing to one individual may not be arousing to other individuals.”

Interestingly, innocent categories like “crafts” and “animals” appear in a Google search for Kliprr, as well as in cached versions of the site. Was the “Pinterest for erotica” originally just another generic Pinterest competitor?

Kliprr says it wasn’t. While the site was always intended for erotic content, “[we] used general categories, non-pornographic content, headings etc purely for our testers prior to the launch of Kliprr.”

Kliprr isn’t the first attempt to create a “Pinterest for Men”, as other sites have come (and gone) in the same space. A similar site, Snatchly, signed up 15,000 users the first two months it launched. Sex.com, which sold for an unprecedented $13 million, turned itself into a similar style of site.

The strategy of adapting a popular website’s business model for porn might just work. Offbeatr calls itself “Crowdfunding for Fetish Communities and the Adult Industry,” but feels an awful lot like “Kickstarter for porn” — and it fills a niche, considering that Kickstarter itself doesn’t allow funding of pornography projects.

Photo via Kliprr